Thinking map for writing a story

Every word has the power to make something happen. Authors aren't struck with great story ideas, they work for them. Just like Peyton Manning had to practice to become a first class quarterback or Venus Williams had to practice before becoming a terrific tennis player, authors too must practice by looking for ideas and then trying to stretch those ideas out. Here's some ways we help students look for ideas around them.

Thinking map for writing a story

Subscribe to our FREE email newsletter and download free character development worksheets! Everyone seemed to be writing about Sinatra.

Talese remained in L. It was the best because Talese had put the work in, paid attention, and gone beyond an article about a man everyone knew of. Your piece must have the most essential element in any story: It must be a story.

In nonfiction, like fiction, what readers need more than anything is a reason to care, to want to know what happens next, how it will all turn out. And stories are driven by tension. First you have to find it. Then you have to tell it.

Training Your Ear for Tension Stories are everywhere if you learn to look. Here are some ways to find them. Think of the whole story. When approaching a new story, look beyond the newsworthy item that led you there.

But think about all that might have led to that moment. What might seem to you like a boring ribbon-cutting ceremony for a new business may really be the culmination of a lifelong dream for the owner.

An ordinary high school graduation could be a moment of triumph for a student who overcame great obstacles to hold her diploma. In the end, it might not be about a game at all.

Overview: Making Sense of Chaos

Listen … to everyone. Seek to be surprised. Let them jabber away. If the tension is not obvious from the start, it often shows itself through an offhand comment or some seemingly trivial fact. Uncovering those means talking not just to the big players in the story, but to everyone you can.

I woke up one morning to discover that a well-known local panhandler had died. Ray was known for changing into three different suits throughout the day as he wandered downtown Flint, Mich.

I thought his eccentricities were enough to write about—and really, they would have made a fine article. Those bits of information and anecdotes created a mosaic of Ray that brought him to life—and they also led me to Joshua Spencer, a local businessman who had been especially kind to Ray, even driving him to the doctor.

What does a sick and lonely man talk about with one of the few people he trusts? It opened like this: Do you see it there? Hollandsworth opened the story by showing the now-elderly first generation of players in the stands at a recent game.

He then went back in time to the exact, tense moment when one of those female players had the guts to ask for more practice time on the court. It was the scene that had lead to their current legacy: One day after practice, Redin noticed a group of coeds standing by the gym door.

They were members of the Wayland Girls Basket-ball Club, which played a handful of games each year against nearby high schools and junior colleges. A young woman swallowed nervously and told Redin that the Girls Basket-ball Club would like more practice time at the gym.

They also wanted to play more games against better opponents. And who, exactly, would you want to play? Well, said the young woman, maybe you could help us schedule games against some of those AAU teams.STRATEGY: Thinking Maps - Tools for Learning The Thinking Maps are a common visual language based on FUNDAMENTAL COGNITIVE PROCESS that is .

The Purdue Writing Lab Purdue University students, faculty, and staff at our West Lafayette, IN campus may access this area for information on the award-winning Purdue Writing Lab. This area includes Writing Lab hours, services, and contact information.

Help with Opening PDF Files. Help your students children classify ideas and communicate more effectively.

thinking map for writing a story

Use graphic organizers to structure writing projects, to help in problem solving, decision making, studying, planning research and brainstorming. Eliminate all but the essential words. Get out your editor’s pen, and cross out any word that isn’t absolutely needed.

If that means shorter, choppier sentences, that’s just fine, because it . The Wizard of Oz tells the story of Dorothy, The world of Thinking Maps was forever changed when, more than 17 years ago, Jane Buckner agreed to join us as a consultant and author.

From the creation of Write from the Beginning and Write from the Beginning Re-Thinking Thinking Maps Webinar;. I though I would write a little follow up to yesterday's post. I introduced the FLEE map to my class as a way to organize their thoughts.

A FLEE map is a perfect choice for the retelling of a story as well as an outline for their own story.

Story Map - ReadWriteThink